St. John Wort Herb Cut

$7.99

Botanical NameHypericum perforatum

 Common Name:

  • English:  Common St. John’s wort
  • Unani: Heufaariqoon, Bassant, Balsaan
  • Also, known as: Balsana, bassan, bossant, common St John’s Wort, corazoncillo, dendlu, devil’s scourge, echtes Johanniskraut, Eisenblut, erba di San Giovanni, fl or de sao joao, fuga daemonum, hardhay, Hartheu, herbe à mille trous, herbe de millepertuis, Herrgottsblut, Hexenkraut, hierba de San Juan, hiperico, hipericon, houfarighoun, iperico, Jageteufel, Johannisblut, Johanniskraut, John’s wort, Jottannesort, klamath weed, Konradskraut, Liebeskraut, Lord God’s wonder plant, Mille pertuis, Mannskraft, millepertuis, pelicao, perforata, perforate St John’s wort, pinillo de oro, quian-ceng lou, St Jan’s kraut, St John’s Wort, seiyouotogiri, sint janskruid, Tupfelharthen, tenturotou, Teufelsfl ucht, Tüpfelhartheu, witches’s herb, zwieroboij, Hierba de San Juan, Perforata, Dadi, Hynfarikun, Chin-ssút’sao, Johnswort, St. John’s Grass, Klamath Weed, Saint John

Origin: Bulgaria

Harvested: Wild

Parts Used: Leaves & flowers, Herb top                                                       

General Information:

St. John wort grows abundantly in the United States and Europe. An ornamental herb to our meadows often considered a pest when too freely mingled in corn and wheat fields. It is said that St. John’s wort is well known among bakers, as a small quantity added to the flour improves the quality of bread. An herbaceous perennial growing freely wild to a height of 1 to 3 feet in the uncultivated ground, woods, hedges, roadsides, and meadows; short, decumbent, barren shoots and erect stems branching in the upper part, glabrous; leaves pale green, sessile, oblong, with pellucid dots or oil glands which may be seen on holding leaf to light. Flowers bright cheery yellow in a terminal corymb. Calyx and corolla marked with black dots and lines, sepals; ovary pear-shaped with three long styles. Stamens in three bundles joined by their bases only. Blooms June to August, followed by numerous small round blackish seeds which have a resinous smell and are contained in a three-celled capsule; odour peculiar, taste bitter, astringent and balsamic.

How to use:

Hot Infusion:

The basic method for dried herbs and flower is, take 2-3 tablespoons of dried herb in a cup or teapot. Pour hot water over it and cover it with lid for 10-30 minutes. Hot water is needed to draw out the antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, flavonoids, and volatile oils from the botanicals. Strain and squeeze out as much as liquid as possible and enjoy!

Tips:

  • You can sweeten your herbal tea with a bit of honey, natural fruit juice, stevia leaves powder and or licorice root powder.
  • You can make ice cubes or pops by freezing tea in ice trays or pop molds.

Precautions: 

You should consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

All information on this website is for educational purposes ONLY.

This information has not been evaluated by Health Canada.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.