Mistletoe Herb Cut

$7.49

Botanical Name Viscum album

Common Name:

  • English: European Mistletoe
  • Also, known as: Mistel, Gui blanc, Liga, Olma, Banda, Visco quercino, Kishmish-j-kawaliyan, San-shang-chi-sheng, Birdlime Mistletoe, Herbe de la Croix, Mystyldene, Lignum Crucis
  • Ayurvedic: Bandaaka, Suvarnabandaaka, Vrikshaadani
  • Unani: Kishmish Kaabuli

Habitat: Native to Europe

Origin:  Albania

Harvested: Wild

Parts Used: Leaves & stems                                                             

General Information:

Mistletoe is found throughout Europe, and in this country is particularly common in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. The well-known Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant, growing on the branches of trees, where it forms pendent bushes, 2 to 5 feet in diameter. It will grow and has been found on almost any deciduous tree, preferring those with soft bark, and being, perhaps, commonest on old Apple trees, though it is frequently found on the Ash, Hawthorn, Lime and other trees. On the Oak, it grows very seldom. It has been found on the Cedar of Lebanon and on the Larch, but very rarely on the Pear tree.

The stem is yellowish and smooth, freely forked, separating when dead into bone-like joints. The leaves are tongue-shaped, broader towards the end, 1 to 3 inches long, very thick and leathery, of a dull yellow-green color, arranged in pairs, with very short footstalks. The flowers, small and inconspicuous, are arranged in threes, in close short spikes or clusters in the forks of the branches, and are of two varieties, the male and female occurring on different plants. Neither male nor female flowers have a corolla, the parts of the fructification springing from the yellowish calyx. They open in May. The fruit is a globular, smooth, white berry, ripening in December.

How to use:

Hot Infusion:

The basic method for dried herbs and flower is, take 2-3 tablespoons of dried herb in a cup or teapot. Pour hot water over it and cover it with lid for 10-30 minutes. Hot water is needed to draw out the antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, flavonoids, and volatile oils from the botanicals. Strain and squeeze out as much as liquid as possible and enjoy!

Tips:

  • You can sweeten your herbal tea with a bit of honey, natural fruit juice, stevia leaves powder and or licorice root powder.
  • You can make ice cubes or pops by freezing tea in ice trays or pop molds.

Precautions: 

You should consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

All information on this website is for educational purposes ONLY.

This information has not been evaluated by Health Canada.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.