Mace Powder

$18.49

Botanical NameMyristica fragrans

Common Name:

  • English:  Macis German: Muskatlute
Italian: mace, macis ,macía Indian: jaffatry, javatri, jawatrie
  • Also, known as:  Zavantri, Javantari, Jayfal

Origin:  Indonesia

Harvested: Cultivated

Parts Used:                                                                  

General Information:

The nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans) is a tropical evergreen that produces both nutmeg and mace. Mace is the red lacy coating (called the aril) that encases the nutmeg seed. When the tree's fruit reaches maturity, it splits open and reveals the aril and seed. The fruit is harvested and the aril is removed by hand, flattened, and left to dry outside for 10 to 14 days. The red aril takes on an amber-, yellow- or orange-brown color as it dries and, when left whole, is called a "blade" of mace. The blades are sold as is or processed into a ground spice.

The Myristica fragrans evergreen tree is indigenous to the Moluccas Islands in Indonesia, also known as the Spice Islands. Grown extensively in other tropical regions, this plant can be found from China to Sri Lanka, the Caribbean, and South America. Although it said mace arrived in Europe in the 12th century thanks to Arab merchants, it was the prosperous spice trade of the 16th century that made it more widely available around the world, alongside cloves, nutmeg, and black pepper

Mace is native to Indonesia and also found in some Caribbean islands, particularly Grenada, where nutmeg is the national symbol and appears on the country's flag.

The Myristica fragrans evergreen tree is indigenous to the Moluccas Islands in Indonesia, also known as the Spice Islands. Grown extensively in other tropical regions, this plant can be found from China to Sri Lanka, the Caribbean, and South America. Although it said mace arrived in Europe in the 12th century thanks to Arab merchants, it was the prosperous spice trade of the 16th century that made it more widely available around the world, alongside cloves, nutmeg, and black pepper.

 

How to use:

Powdered Herb:

There are different ways to use powdered herb.

Food Preparation: You can add powdered herbs to any super food, herbal smoothie, sauces, spreads and even cookies. Also for children, you can mix powdered herbs with honey or glycerin to make a paste. The thicker the paste, the more potent and herbal in taste. The sweet taste of honey and glycerin will help the medicine go down. This method is also known as "Electuaries".

Capsules: Encapsulating your own powdered herb at home, give you assurance that the contents of the capsules are pure herb and no filler or any other products. These capsules can be taken with liquid.

Poultice: Poultice can be made with an herbal powder and liquid (mostly water) to form a paste which is then applied to the skin. This method is very helpful for skin conditions.

Herbal shot: Powdered herb can be mixed with water, fruit juice or other liquid to make herbal shot. 

Precautions: 

You should consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

All information on this website is for educational purposes ONLY.

This information has not been evaluated by Health Canada.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.