Guar Gum Seed Powder

$7.99

Botanical NameCyamopsis tetragonoloba

Common Name:

  • English:  Guar seed, Cluster seed
  • Ayurvedic: Kshudra Shimbi, Gorakshaphalini, Guaar, Gwaalin
  • Unani: Guaar phali
  • Also, known as: Guwar, Gavar, Gawar, Guvar bean, Gawaar, Goruchikkudu kaya, Gokarakaya, Gorikayi, JavaLikaayi, Chavalikayi, Kotthavarai, Goma guar, Gomme de guar, Guargummi, Guarkernmehl, Guāra sveķus, Gumy guar, Guma de guar, Guarkernmehl, Guaran, Goma guar, Galactomannan.

 

Habitat: Throughout India

Origin: India  

Harvested: Cultivated

Parts Used: Seed                                                                 

General Information:

Guar is a native to the Indian subcontinent. Guar is grown mainly in India, Pakistan, United States and, in some part of Africa and Australia. Guar was only used as rich protein to feed cattle once upon a time. It is also used as green vegetable in India. After Second World War there was major shortage of locust bean gum which adversely affected the textile and paper industries. At that time Guar Gum was found as the most suitable substitute for scarce locust bean gum. In 1953 the extraction technology of guar gum was commercialized in USA and India after decade of period.

Guar Gum plant is an annual plant known as 'Cyamopsis Tetragonaloba'.  The important source of nutrition to human and animals is the legume, it regenerates soil nitrogen and the endosperm of guar seed is an important hydrocolloid widely used across a broad spectrum of industries.

The guar plant grows from 4 feet to 9 feet high. The plant’s flower buds start out white and change to a light pink as the flower opens. The flowers turn deep purple and are followed by fleshy seed pods which ripen and harvested in summer. The seed pods grow in clusters giving guar the common name cluster-bean. A gum extracted from the guar beans forms a gel in water, commonly referred to as guar gum.  

How to use:

Powdered Herb:

There are different ways to use powdered herb.

Food Preparation: You can add powdered herbs to any super food, herbal smoothie, sauces, spreads and even cookies. Also for children, you can mix powdered herbs with honey or glycerin to make a paste. The thicker the paste, the more potent and herbal in taste. The sweet taste of honey and glycerin will help the medicine go down. This method is also known as "Electuaries".

Capsules: Encapsulating your own powdered herb at home, give you assurance that the contents of the capsules are pure herb and no filler or any other products. These capsules can be taken with liquid.

Poultice: Poultice can be made with an herbal powder and liquid (mostly water) to form a paste which is then applied to the skin. This method is very helpful for skin conditions.

Herbal shot: Powdered herb can be mixed with water, fruit juice or other liquid to make herbal shot. 

Precautions: 

You should consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

All information on this website is for educational purposes ONLY.

This information has not been evaluated by Health Canada.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.